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Open Wide - The Official Blog of The Chicago Dental Society

Permanent link  Chairside Screenings for Chronic Diseases Could Bring Big Savings

02/26/2014

Screenings by dentists for the most common chronic medical diseases could save the American health care system as much as $102.6 million annually, according to a new study conducted by the American Dental Association's Health Policy Resources Center (HPRC).

The findings were published Feb. 13 in the American Journal of Public Health.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7.8 percent of the U.S. population has undiagnosed hypertension, 2.7 percent has undiagnosed diabetes and 8.2 percent has undiagnosed high cholesterol. Screening for these conditions in dental offices could lead to savings of up to $102.6 million, or $33 per person screened, and healthier outcomes for patients.

“As many as 27 million people visit a dentist but not a physician in a given year,” Kamyar Nasseh, PhD, lead author of the study said in a prepared release. “This presents an opportunity for dentists to be part of an integrated health care team working to combat chronic illnesses.”

There is potential for additional savings over the long term through prevention, health promotion, and early interventions that the study did not model.

“We have long known that the mouth is the window to the body,” said ADA President Charles H. Norman.“But we have an increased understanding about roles that dentists can play in detecting chronic, systemic disease. This study shows that dentists can contribute to reduced health care costs in the U.S. by screening for chronic conditions.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all American adults suffer from chronic illnesses, which account for more than 75 percent of health care costs and 70 percent of deaths each year in the United States. Chronic diseases are estimated to cost the country $153 billion annually in lost productivity.

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ada , dental care ,


Permanent link  American Dental Association Updates Dental X-Ray Recommendations

12/07/2012

In an effort to decrease radiation exposure to patients, the American Dental Association’s (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs collaborated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to update the ADA’s recommendations for dental X-ray examinations. The recommendations were released recently.

Changes to the recommendations include: 

  • Updates to patient shielding recommendations
  • Addition of a new section on limiting radiation exposure during radiographic examinations 
  • Including new topics such as receptor selection, handheld X-ray units, technique charts and radiation risk communication . 

The ADA’s Dental Radiograph Examinations: Recommendations for Patient Selection and Limiting Radiation Exposure are intended to be used in conjunction with dentists’ professional judgment to determine whether and when dental X-rays are needed. 

“As doctors of oral health, dentists are in the best position to make decisions on whether to prescribe dental X-rays after an oral examination and with consideration of the patient’s health history. Prescribing dental X-rays should be an individualized process,” said ADA President Robert A. Faiella. Since 1989, the ADA has recommended the ALARA principle in relation to dental X-rays—that radiation exposure to patients is “as low as reasonably achievable.”

The ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs (CSA) consulted with dental radiology experts about a year ago to update the recommendations. The CSA then sent the recommendations for peer review and for review by non-dental organizations such as the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.  The recommendations are intended to serve as a resource for dentists and are not intended to be standards of care, requirements or regulations.

Categories

ada , xrays ,


Permanent link  American Dental Association Updates Dental X-Ray Recommendations

12/07/2012

In an effort to decrease radiation exposure to patients, the American Dental Association’s (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs collaborated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to update the ADA’s recommendations for dental X-ray examinations. The recommendations were released recently.

Changes to the recommendations include: 

  • Updates to patient shielding recommendations
  • Addition of a new section on limiting radiation exposure during radiographic examinations 
  • Including new topics such as receptor selection, handheld X-ray units, technique charts and radiation risk communication . 

The ADA’s Dental Radiograph Examinations: Recommendations for Patient Selection and Limiting Radiation Exposure are intended to be used in conjunction with dentists’ professional judgment to determine whether and when dental X-rays are needed. 

“As doctors of oral health, dentists are in the best position to make decisions on whether to prescribe dental X-rays after an oral examination and with consideration of the patient’s health history. Prescribing dental X-rays should be an individualized process,” said ADA President Robert A. Faiella. Since 1989, the ADA has recommended the ALARA principle in relation to dental X-rays—that radiation exposure to patients is “as low as reasonably achievable.”

The ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs (CSA) consulted with dental radiology experts about a year ago to update the recommendations. The CSA then sent the recommendations for peer review and for review by non-dental organizations such as the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.  The recommendations are intended to serve as a resource for dentists and are not intended to be standards of care, requirements or regulations.

Categories

ada , xrays ,


Permanent link  Tell your patients about Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

09/26/2012

This weekend is the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency's National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. This Saturday, Sept. 29, people can bring their unwanted or expired medications — including opioid painkillers — to disposal sites across the country.

The American Dental Association is supporting this effort, and encouraging all dentists to talk with their patients and staffs about safely securing and disposing of unused, unwanted or expired pharmaceuticals.

"This is yet another way that we can be leaders in our communities and do our part to help improve drug abuse awareness," Chicago Dental Society president John Gerding said. "The increase in drug use among our middle through high school aged children is alarming, and an event such as Saturday's is one more step in our battle to stay on top of this problem."

Prescription medications are now the most commonly abused drugs among children ages 12–13, and second to marijuana among young adults, according to 2010 data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Studies show that a majority of these drugs are obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.

Dentists and their staff can help address this problem:

  • Tell patients or their caregivers about the dangers of using prescription drugs for non-medical purposes.
  • Encourage patients to visit the Medicine Abuse Project at www.medicineabuseproject.org, where they can learn how to safely secure, monitor and dispose of unused, unwanted or expired prescription medications.
  • Have a list of local DEA-approved prescription drug disposal sites. You can search by zip code online.

 On the last Take-Back Day, April 28, Americans brought a record 276 tons of prescription drugs for proper disposal to more than 5,600 locations. 

"Drug-seeking behavior has changed dramatically in recent years," said ADA President William Calnon, in a prepared release. “For that reason, we are also urging dentists to refresh their knowledge about opioid prescribing in the context of modern-day drug seeking behavior."

 

Categories

ada , consumer products , patient , safety ,


Permanent link  Tell your patients about Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

09/26/2012

This weekend is the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency's National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. This Saturday, Sept. 29, people can bring their unwanted or expired medications — including opioid painkillers — to disposal sites across the country.

The American Dental Association is supporting this effort, and encouraging all dentists to talk with their patients and staffs about safely securing and disposing of unused, unwanted or expired pharmaceuticals.

"This is yet another way that we can be leaders in our communities and do our part to help improve drug abuse awareness," Chicago Dental Society president John Gerding said. "The increase in drug use among our middle through high school aged children is alarming, and an event such as Saturday's is one more step in our battle to stay on top of this problem."

Prescription medications are now the most commonly abused drugs among children ages 12–13, and second to marijuana among young adults, according to 2010 data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Studies show that a majority of these drugs are obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.

Dentists and their staff can help address this problem:

  • Tell patients or their caregivers about the dangers of using prescription drugs for non-medical purposes.
  • Encourage patients to visit the Medicine Abuse Project at www.medicineabuseproject.org, where they can learn how to safely secure, monitor and dispose of unused, unwanted or expired prescription medications.
  • Have a list of local DEA-approved prescription drug disposal sites. You can search by zip code online.

 On the last Take-Back Day, April 28, Americans brought a record 276 tons of prescription drugs for proper disposal to more than 5,600 locations. 

"Drug-seeking behavior has changed dramatically in recent years," said ADA President William Calnon, in a prepared release. “For that reason, we are also urging dentists to refresh their knowledge about opioid prescribing in the context of modern-day drug seeking behavior."

 

Categories

ada , consumer products , patient , safety ,