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Permanent link  Image Gently campaign offers advice on pediatric X-rays

09/26/2014

The American Dental Association has partnered with more than 80 professional health are organizations – including nine other dental organizations - to encourage safe pediatric imaging during medical exams.

The Image Gently campaign has developed educational and scientific materials to help dental professionals optimize radiation dose during these pediatric exams. Image Gently has also produced downloadable materials to help parents ask more informed questions of their dental providers whenever scans are recommended for their children.

The campaign is conducted by the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging, founded by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, the American College of Radiology, the American Society of Radiologic Technologists and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The participating professional organizations represent more than a million health care providers worldwide.

"Dentists use X-rays to diagnose disease or damage that isn't visible during an exam. Children may require X-rays as an adjunct aid to diagnose dental decay or to assess growth and development for orthodontic treatment." said ADA President Charles H. Norman III "It's important for dentists and parents to have meaningful conversations about children's X-rays."

Imaging has an important role in improved dental health – but children are, in general, more sensitive to radiation than adults. As such, health care providers should reduce radiation dose used in children's imaging and avoid unwarranted imaging. The Image Gently campaign encourages dental providers to consider the following guidelines:

  • Select X-rays for individual needs, not as a routine. Use X-rays only when essential for diagnosis and treatment — based on a review of the patient and their dental history. 

  • Use the fastest image receptor available. When film X-ray is used, select "E"- or "F"-speed. Set exposure parameters as low as possible for diagnostic digital imaging.

  • Use cone-beam CT (CBCT) only when necessary. CBCT should be restricted in children to cases in which it is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning.
  • Collimate beam to area of interest. For intraoral X-rays, collimation should be rectangular to match recording area of detector. For extraoral X-rays, including cone-beam CT, restrict beam to the area needed for diagnosis.

  • Always use thyroid shield. The thyroid gland in children is particularly sensitive to radiation. Use of a properly positioned shield significantly reduces the dose to the thyroid. 

  • Child-size the exposure time. Less exposure time needed for children as oral structures are smaller than in adults.

 Dental professionals are also urged to visit ImageGently.org and pledge to Image Gently.

"The materials made available through the Image Gently campaign will help general and specialty dentists 'child size' their imaging techniques and provide even better and safer treatment to all patients, especially children," said Alan G. Lurie, immediate past president of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. "To have North American and European dental societies involved in Image Gently sends a clear, strong message about the importance of this effort."

Image Gently alliance members in dentistry include the American Dental Association; American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology; American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons; American Association of Endodontists; American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology; American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry; American Academy of Periodontology; American Dental Education Association; Canadian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology; and the European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology.

 

Categories

children , pediatric dentistry , xrays ,


Permanent link  Dental student's posters helps patients understand dental X-rays

01/14/2013

Connecticut dental student Jevin Carruth knows that an increasing number of patients are questioning the safety of dental x-rays. His challenge, however, was to find a simple answer that would put patients at ease.

He sought information from sources like the American Nuclear Society to show the amount of radiation given off by dental X-rays compared to other common sources of radiation, such as a cross-country flight. He added visual elements to illustrate complicated scientific principles for common use, and he laminated it for repeated reference in the dental office. His poster, "Radiation Facts" compares dental X-rays to sunlight, breathing, and a full-body CT scan.

 Xraychart

Today, Mr. Carruth is selling this illustration to clinicians the country. Posters and handouts are available in three colors for purchase in packages ranging from $15-$100, with 10 percent of sales to CDS members benefitting the Illinois Mission of Mercy. 

For more information contact Mr. Carruth, UCONN School of Dental Medicine Class of 2015, at JCARRUTH@student.uchc.edu.

Remind him that you learned about it from CDS, so that the Illinois Mission of Mercy benefits from your purchase.

 

Categories

consumer products , dental education , patient , products , xrays ,


Permanent link  American Dental Association Updates Dental X-Ray Recommendations

12/07/2012

In an effort to decrease radiation exposure to patients, the American Dental Association’s (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs collaborated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to update the ADA’s recommendations for dental X-ray examinations. The recommendations were released recently.

Changes to the recommendations include: 

  • Updates to patient shielding recommendations
  • Addition of a new section on limiting radiation exposure during radiographic examinations 
  • Including new topics such as receptor selection, handheld X-ray units, technique charts and radiation risk communication . 

The ADA’s Dental Radiograph Examinations: Recommendations for Patient Selection and Limiting Radiation Exposure are intended to be used in conjunction with dentists’ professional judgment to determine whether and when dental X-rays are needed. 

“As doctors of oral health, dentists are in the best position to make decisions on whether to prescribe dental X-rays after an oral examination and with consideration of the patient’s health history. Prescribing dental X-rays should be an individualized process,” said ADA President Robert A. Faiella. Since 1989, the ADA has recommended the ALARA principle in relation to dental X-rays—that radiation exposure to patients is “as low as reasonably achievable.”

The ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs (CSA) consulted with dental radiology experts about a year ago to update the recommendations. The CSA then sent the recommendations for peer review and for review by non-dental organizations such as the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.  The recommendations are intended to serve as a resource for dentists and are not intended to be standards of care, requirements or regulations.

Categories

ada , xrays ,


Permanent link  American Dental Association Updates Dental X-Ray Recommendations

12/07/2012

In an effort to decrease radiation exposure to patients, the American Dental Association’s (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs collaborated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to update the ADA’s recommendations for dental X-ray examinations. The recommendations were released recently.

Changes to the recommendations include: 

  • Updates to patient shielding recommendations
  • Addition of a new section on limiting radiation exposure during radiographic examinations 
  • Including new topics such as receptor selection, handheld X-ray units, technique charts and radiation risk communication . 

The ADA’s Dental Radiograph Examinations: Recommendations for Patient Selection and Limiting Radiation Exposure are intended to be used in conjunction with dentists’ professional judgment to determine whether and when dental X-rays are needed. 

“As doctors of oral health, dentists are in the best position to make decisions on whether to prescribe dental X-rays after an oral examination and with consideration of the patient’s health history. Prescribing dental X-rays should be an individualized process,” said ADA President Robert A. Faiella. Since 1989, the ADA has recommended the ALARA principle in relation to dental X-rays—that radiation exposure to patients is “as low as reasonably achievable.”

The ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs (CSA) consulted with dental radiology experts about a year ago to update the recommendations. The CSA then sent the recommendations for peer review and for review by non-dental organizations such as the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.  The recommendations are intended to serve as a resource for dentists and are not intended to be standards of care, requirements or regulations.

Categories

ada , xrays ,


Permanent link  3D Imaging on Wheels

02/24/2011


We were intrigued by this big van in the middle of the exhibit floor.

Turns out, its a mobile imaging unit that provides 3D scans for treatment planning, owned and operated by Deborah Vessell. She tells us about the service and how it helps dentists.




Categories

xrays , products , midwinter meeting 2011 ,