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Open Wide - The Official Blog of The Chicago Dental Society

Permanent link  Two dental organizations back dental therapist programs

01/20/2010

Recently the Chicago Dental Society received word that two dental associations are positioning themselves at the forefront of the controversy over dental therapists.

Earlier this week, the American Association of Public Health Dentistry announced that the W. K. Kellogg Foundation and the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation were funding a grant to develop a two-year, post-secondary school curriculum for dental therapists.

The project will be headed by Dr. Caswell Evans, Chairman of a related Kellogg Foundation Advisory Committee, and Associate Dean for Prevention and Public Health Sciences at the UIC College of Dentistry, and will also encompass curriculum changes within dental schools so that dentists will be able to supervise dental therapists, educational settings in which to deliver training to dental therapists, the path for career development and skill advancement, and licensure and accreditation issues.

Last week, DrBicuspid.com (registration required) reported that the Connecticut State Dental Association (CSDA) was backing a pilot program to bring dental health aide therapists into the state. In November of last year, the CSDA House of Delegates voted to set up a demonstration project, which will take two years to establish.

The organization wants to investigate whether dental therapists could improve access to care, particularly for school children.

The Academy of General Dentistry and Connecticut Dental Hygienists' Association have both sharply criticized the plan.

CSDA president Bruce Tandy, DMD, says, "We're trying to take control of the issue before someone else takes control of it for us."

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DHAT , access to care ,


Permanent link  CDS Blogging Contest: Soda is liquid calories

01/19/2010

Last fall, the Chicago Dental Society turned its newspaper journalism contest into a blogging contest open to any high school student in Cook, Lake or DuPage County who answered the question, "Is Soda Just Liquid Candy?"

Full details on how to enter are posted to our contest Web page. Deadline for entries is February 1, 2010.


This entry is by Surai D. 
 

Coke, Pepsi, Fanta, 7-up, Dr. Pepper, there are numerous amounts of brands and flavors for soda and with its tasteful packaging, teenagers are drawn to the carbonated wonder of soda. But most don't realize, that it truly is a calorie filled, sugar coated way to increase your risk of obesity, tooth decay, and many other health risks. You should never have too much of anything, but because soda is liquid calories, teenagers don't necessarily realize how much they're consuming. I'm a student who believes that soda is disgustingly bad for you and its acidic carbonated texture is just too much. The only thing that is just as bad as consuming soft drinks is its availability. Vending Machines can be found throughout any high school and you would like to imagine that they are trying to persuade you to buy some refreshing water or juice, but in reality those machines are filled with soft drinks that contain 140-240 calories. The reason being, schools need funding, so they sign pouring contracts with soda companies and then they have to sell it throughout the school day. I'm proud to say that Fremd High school doesn't open their vending machines until after school, but it's not enough. Students feel as if they need it, but this caffeine they think they need causes them to be alert for a little while, but then increasingly makes them nervous, irritable, or sleepy. Pop can also be appealing by its sugary sweet taste, but this taste is what is eroding at your tooth enamel. One 20oz bottle of pop sold in many school vending machines contains up to 15 teaspoons of sugar. Milk or water is healthier alternatives to a quick drink, but soft drinks are too well advertised at many schools. The drinks are colorful and have splashy, refreshing designs, if milk was introduced with younger more colorful packaging, it could begin to appeal to teenagers more so than soft drinks. According to National Institutes of Health, the empty calories lower the intake of important nutrients, which displace nutritious food in the diet. I believe that pop is a major obesity risk especially in America. It is appealing, available, and cheap at only $1.25 students feel as if it's the perfect drink after a busy long day at school and will help energize them for their after school activities. The caffeine in most soft drinks causes students to be hooked and wanting more. Next time you decide to pick up that can of Pepsi at a party, remember the overweight teenagers in America, remember your teeth and consider those lean, strong, and powerful ads of "Got Milk?"


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Permanent link  CDS Blogging Contest: Soda is unhealthy

01/19/2010

Last fall, the Chicago Dental Society turned its newspaper journalism contest into a blogging contest open to any high school student in Cook, Lake or DuPage County who answered the question, "Is Soda Just Liquid Candy?"

Full details on how to enter are posted to our contest Web page. Deadline for entries is February 1, 2010.


This entry is by Matt B.
 

Ask the normal high school teen what their favorite drink is and the response that most teens will retort is something along the lines of Pepsi, or Dr. Pepper. Essential drinks like orange juice and milk are usually totally ignored and replaced by drinks like Pepsi which offer no nutritional value. Soda drinks are high in sugar and calories, and in many cases can cause people, especially teens, to become dependant on these. These drinks are loaded with caffiene and in extreme cases lead to kids drinking a whole 12 pack of soda every day. Oral problems like cavities and other things lead to a higher percentage of root canals, crowns, and bridges, due to this constant influx of sugar. If these drinks are substituted for a much healthier choice like milk, oral problems would decrease dramatically along with better lifestyles for teens.


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Permanent link  High tech caries detection: Our interview with Midwinter speaker Dr. John Flucke

01/18/2010


At the age of three, Dr. John Flucke performed his first extraction (on his older sister's loose tooth) and immediately thereafter announced to his mother that he was going to be a dentist. He now has a practice in Lee's Summit, MO, and is clearly passionate about what he does. He writes a new post for his Dental Technology Blog nearly every day and is also known as dentistry's "Technology Evangelist." He will be teaching the course "Advanced Digital Caries Detection" at the Midwinter Meeting. You can also follow Dr. Flucke at his Twitter account, @jflucke.

Q: What drew you to the topic of advanced digital caries detection?

Dr. John Flucke:
I've always been a "why" person. Why we do the things we do and how we can do them better fascinates me. Caries detection is intrinsically part of dentistry so I really wanted to become familiar with the new devices and why they can help.

Q: What will this course look like?

JF: It's a lecture format that goes over the devices that are currently available.

Q: In your opinion, what is the best or most effective caries detection device on the market today?

JF:
My answer to that would be "it depends." All of them are accurate and provide valuable data. The choice really comes down to how a practice operates. In a fast-paced, high patient-turnover practice, some devices will be better suited than others.

Q: What are the best new treatments for dental decay?

JF: Minimally invasive/more conservative treatment modalities are definitely the way to go if the situation will allow it. Self-etching resins are now a reality and other changes are coming that will allow us to minimally restore with ease.

Q: What do you think are the biggest deficiencies in most dental offices with regards to caries detection?

JF: Many people feel that finding caries can be done just as easily with traditional methods and that is just not the case. I've had people tell me that they are just fine with an explorer. It's all about educating doctors and then helping our patients.

Q: How many times have you been to the Midwinter Meeting?

JF: Wow, I think every year since 1996 or so.

Q: What's your advice for visiting Chicago in February?

JF: Bring something to cover your ears! One year I didn't do that and looked like an idiot as I ran around the city with my gloved hands pressed to the side of my head! Seriously, don't let the cold deter you. Chicago is one of the best cities in the world for a reason. You've got to get out there and explore it!

Q: Do you have any tips or tricks for navigating the Meeting?

JF: If you know you are looking for certain things, make a list and then get a map of the show floor and map out your route. Also, the second day on the show floor is not usually as busy as the first day.

Q: Do you defy any "dentist stereotypes"? Can you share any other fun personal facts?

JF: I'm a combination geek/dentist personality type. I'm completely process driven and I've been known to drive people crazy asking questions about how/why things work the way they do. I don't sleep much and I always take off my left shoe first.

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rachel zanders , midwinter meeting 2010 ,


Permanent link  CDS Blogging Contest

01/18/2010

Last fall, the Chicago Dental Society turned its newspaper journalism contest into a blogging contest open to any high school student in Cook, Lake or DuPage County who answered the question, "Is Soda Just Liquid Candy?"

Full details on how to enter are posted to our contest Web page. Deadline for entries is February 1, 2010.


This entry is by Ashton S. 

Soda soda soda not for sale
Soda is bad for your teeth
It cause cavities
All the acid from the pop it may weaken your teeth
Root canals brace face, gap teeth, cavities, ugly teeth
All brown and yellow gums all black and brown
You're not going to be able to speak at the age of 45 because your teeth would have fallen out

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blogging contest ,


Permanent link  CDS Blogging Contest: Advertising targets teens

01/15/2010

Last fall, the Chicago Dental Society turned its newspaper journalism contest into a blogging contest open to any high school student in Cook, Lake or DuPage County who answered the question, "Is Soda Just Liquid Candy?"

Full details on how to enter are posted to our contest Web page. Deadline for entries is February 1, 2010.


This entry is by Rebecca B. 

 

Many teens and youth are targeted by advertisement companies. They are after all an easy group of people to persuade to purchase something. If a product is colorful or has an interesting design, a child or teen is more likely to purchase the item. Many soda marketing campaigns have taken advantage of this fact and are targeting kids to buy their product. Soda has absolutely no nutritional value, only adds calories and sugar to a generation of kids struggling with obesity issues. It is very unfair for marketers to try to convince a corrupt youth to purchase their product that will only contribute to the growing problem of overweight children. Soda companies should put the facts out in the open. They should let everyone, not just kids, know what soda can do to their teeth and body if it is consumed excessively.


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Permanent link  Non extreme smile makeovers: Our interview with Midwinter speaker Dr. Harald Heymann

01/09/2010


Dr. Harald Heymann, Professor and Director of Graduate Operative Dentistry at University of North Carolina's School of Dentistry, is an outdoorsman who is passionate about using the most conservative possible methods when performing esthetic dentistry. He will be presenting the course "Non-extreme Esthetic Makeovers Possible," as well as "Adhesive and Restorative Dentistry: Fact and Fiction," at the Midwinter Meeting.

Q: What drew you to the topic of non-extreme esthetic makeovers, and why are you teaching this course?

Dr. Harald Heymann: I think that there's a lot of overtreatment. I try to stress doing as little as possible and yet achieve the goal of improved esthetics. It is important to combine the most conservative methods possible to achieve the desired results.

Q: What will this course look like?

HH: It's a lecture course, and I'll be addressing various whitening methods, from whitening toothpastes to over-the-counter products to in-office products. I'll spend a fair amount of time on how to place etched porcelain veneers. I'll focus on long-term success-the bonds to enamel are so superior to those to dentin. What I present will not be based on anecdote, opinion, and hype, but on good, evidence-based information.

Q: Which procedures are you most discouraging?

HH: Over-treatment and over-preparation of teeth.

Q: What do you think is the dentist's role in guiding a patient when making these decisions?

HH: The dentist should inform the patient of the most conservative options possible. For instance, simple tooth whitening or orthodontia instead of something more extreme. It is the dentist's responsibility to provide the various options and then guide the patient to the most conservative option that will achieve the desired effect.

Q: How many times have you been to the Midwinter Meeting?

HH: Oh gosh, a bunch! I've been teaching now for 32 years, so I've been coming to the meeting in various capacities for a long time. In fact, I believe this is one of the best in the country, no question.

Q: What's your advice for visiting Chicago in February?

HH: Dress warmly! And keep an eye on the weather. I've had overnight trips to the Meeting turn into three- and four-day trips due to unanticipated snow.  So I'd also have to say, be flexible!

Q: Do you have any tips or tricks for navigating the meeting?

HH: I understand they're now going to be concentrating the meeting on the west side of McCormick, and that should really help as far as finding courses, etc.

Q: What do you like to do in your spare time?

HH: Well, I live for the outdoors - skiing, fly fishing, hiking, outdoor photography. I really enjoy just about anything that gets me outside.

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rachel zanders , midwinter meeting 2010 ,


Permanent link  CDS Blogging Contest: Soda in moderation

01/09/2010

Last fall, the Chicago Dental Society turned its newspaper journalism contest into a blogging contest open to any high school student in Cook, Lake or DuPage County who answered the question, "Is Soda Just Liquid Candy?"

Full details on how to enter are posted to our contest Web page. Deadline for entries is February 1, 2010.


This entry is by Nia M. 
 

Soda, the perfect combination of sugar and fizz. It goes well with just about anything, and tastes especially good when you're thirsty on a scorching summer day.

Sounds delicous, huh? Don't you just want a can right now?

Bet you wouldn't want any if I offered you a can of Sprite and said "Hey. Do you want a can of high fructose corn syrup, caffeine, seltzer water, and other chemicals I can't pronounce?"

Maybe not.

Soda is good, I'm not going to lie and I savor the 6 to 8 ounces of chemicals whenever I can.

Unfortunately, I only get to experience the refreshing taste of soda a few times a year. My parents don't believe that my little sister and I should be allowed to drink soda every day, so we only get it on special occasions or when we go out to eat. When we go to the movies, my sister and I split a large lemonade or an iced tea while my parents share a Diet Coke. Even on Christmas or New Year's Eve, they are still hesitant to let me have a can of Coca Cola and force me to share it. My parents tell me that soda is just "sugar water" and that it will mess up my teeth and rust my braces, even though I promise to brush my teeth for fifteen minutes afterwards. They also say that soda tastes disgusting, although they often drink it at the dinner table.

Soda has been accepted as a part of society and can be seen everywhere; from billboards to TV commercials, in the hands of businessmen and teenagers. Soda is not only widely popular for its wide array of flavor or the sizzling sound it makes. The extremely low cost of soda is what really makes this fizzy drink attractive to so many. McDonald's promotes a 32 oz. cup of Coca-Cola for only $1, while healthier options, such as water and orange juice are more expensive. Some corner stores sell cans of soda for as little as .69 each, and 2 liter bottles of soda are often offered for an extra $1.50 when you call in to order a pizza. In the World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, everyone is challenged to taste all 64 flavors of Coca-Cola and each visitor leaves with a free bottle. When you look at the weekly paper, there's always a Dominick's or Jewel's ad for a new "buy two, get one free" sale on 24-can cases of soda. Soda is affordable and fits any budget, and perhaps that's why it remains the favorite drink of many Americans. In the current economic recession, people need as many ways to save money as they possibly can, and sadly, soda is one of those cost-reducing methods.

Sure. It's cheap, it's tasty, it's refreshing, it gives you a quick energy burst. But what the billboards don't tell you is that soda is filled with tons of sugar and empty calories. Remember that 32 oz cup of Coca-Cola I was talking about earlier? One large cup of soda can contain up to 310 calories. If McDonald's advertised 310 calories of sugary liquid for $1 instead of soda, most people would think twice before buying it. Yeah, the kids on TV may seem extremely energetic and happy, but the truth is, soda is filled with caffeine, so it gives you a quick burst of energy, and then you crash (trust me, I'm speaking from experience). Their teeth look as white and sparkly as pearls, so what your parents tell you can't be true. WRONG. Soda is nothing more that liquid sugar with bubbles. After my little sister got her first cavity, our dentist suggested she reduce her soda intake. She did, and when we returned for our next visit, he noticed that her teeth were looking a lot better. If soda companies advertised cavities and an increase in dental bills, soda wouldn't seem so cost-effective to most families.

I'm not against soda, and if I told you that I was, I'd be lying. I'm not telling you to never buy a can of pop again, because I'll probably buy another can of A & W Cream Soda this week. I'm just saying, soda is okay once in a while and you should only have it sparingly. Everyone is supposed to have 6-8 servings of liquid a day. If one of those liquid servings is soda, and the rest are water or tea, you'll notice that you'll feel a lot better. We are given 2,000 to 2,500 calories a day…do you really want to waste 10% of those daily calories on soda? It's cheap, but the consequences of too much soda will cost you more than .69. Just cut back on the Root Beer and Fanta, your teeth and your parents will thank you.


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